Viola Störmer

Assistant Professor

Dr. Viola Störmer received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the Humboldt-University of Berlin, Germany, and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in 2012. She then joined the Vision Sciences Laboratory at Harvard University as a postdoctoral researcher, where she received a Marie Curie fellowship that allowed her to also spend some time at the University Paris Descartes in France. Dr. Störmer’s research aims at understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms of human perception, attention, and multisensory processing. She focuses on identifying and characterizing people’s perceptual and cognitive abilities, as well as their capacity limitations. During her Ph.D. she studied how these limitations change in the course of healthy aging, and she continues to be interested in cognitive development across the lifespan. Dr. Störmer’s work draws on a variety of methods, including psychophysics, experimental psychology, and functional neuroimaging with a particular focus on EEG (electroencephalography). She will teach undergraduate and graduate courses in cognitive neuroscience, perception, multisensory processing, and neuroscience methods.

  • Störmer, V.S., Feng, W., Martinez, A., McDonald, J.J., & Hillyard, S.A. (2016). Salient, irrelevant sounds reflexively induce alpha rhythm desynchronization in parallel with slow potential shifts in visual cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 28(3), 433-445.
  • Störmer, V.S., & Alvarez, G.A. (2014). Feature-based attention elicits surround suppression in feature space. Current Biology, 24(17), 1985-1988. 
  • Störmer, V.S., Alvarez, G.A., & Cavanagh, P. (2014). Within-hemifield competition in early visual areas limits the ability to track multiple objects with attention. The Journal of Neuroscience, 34(35), 11526-11533.
  • Störmer, V.S., McDonald, J.J., & Hillyard, S.A. (2009). Cross-modal cueing of attention alters appearance and early cortical processing of visual stimuli. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 106, 22456-22461.

Updated Sept 2016

Psychology