image by: Nathalie Belanger

The brain's stopping system also affects cognition

In a newly published article in Nature Communications, Dr. Adam Aron and colleagues demonstrated that the same brain system that controls for interruptions during motor movement are also recruited during disruptions of cognitive processes.

Click here to read the press release.

image from: NN – norden.org

Speed reading too good to be true

Is it possible to speed read while keeping comprehension high? Spoiler alert: not really. In a newly published paper, Dr. Keith Rayner (in memoriam), Dr. Elizabeth Schotter, and colleagues review decades of research on reading and speed reading and find little evidence that you can have your cake and eat it too.

Click here to read more.

shutterstock photo

Accuracy of Eyewitness Testimonies

Dr. John Wixted and Dr. Laura Mickes' most recent work expands on prior eyewitness testimony research by using real crime data. Their results showcase the accuracy of eyewitness testimony is strongly related to the confidence of eyewitnesses

Click here to read more.

Photo by Gabriel S. Delgado; source Wikimedia Commons. The original photograph has been modified.

Who’s the ‘Enviest’ of Them All?

“Mirror, mirror, on the wall – who’s the fairest of them all?” New research doesn’t have an answer to that. But it does show that what and how much we envy depends, at least in part, on how old we are. Older people are less envious than younger people. It also appears that both men and women are more likely to envy someone who is approximately their own age.

Click here to read more about Dr. Christine Harris and Nicole Henniger's work.

efantino

The Biennial Boynton Lecture

In honor of Dr. Robert Boynton (a former member of our department: 1974-1991), The Optical Society holds the biennial Boynton Lecture during its Fall Vision Meeting. This year, Dr. Don Macleod was selected to give a lecture on Color, Cones and Connectivity!

Events                                

Department Highlights

  • Experimental Design

    Exploring Experimental Design

    Have you ever thought about what it takes to design a successful experiment? How do you know that you’re asking the right questions? Students from Gail Heyman’s Topics in Learning Science class are here to help! Their short film is designed to guide students new to the idea of experimental design through the basics of the scientific method.

  • Lying

    Lying, Cheating Kids

    A new study by Chelsea Hays and Dr. Leslie Carver finds that children who have been lied to are more likely to lie and cheat themselves. Read more on NBC San Diego.

  • Huffington Post

    Health Guilt

    Research by Nicole Henniger, Dr. Ryan Darby, and Dr. Chris Harris reveals that emotional experiences during patient-physician interactions are crucial in determining how individuals make subsequent medical decisions. Huffington Post covers the story.