Emma Geller

Assistant Teaching Professor

Dr. Geller received her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2016. Her primary research interest is the science of learning and instruction, and her work investigates how students develop deep understanding of concepts in math and science. Her dissertation approached this problem by examining how students learn from instructional videos like those on YouTube channels like Crash Course and Khan Academy. At UCLA, Dr. Geller was a highly rated instructor who taught for many courses in the psychology department. She was also part of a team of instructors teaching a year-long interdisciplinary course about the brain, which covered topics as diverse as neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, history, film, and literature.  As part of this course, she created a freshman seminar that integrated many topics related to her research, including theories of learning and memory, conceptions of expertise, intelligence, and creativity, and evidence-based practices to improve both study strategies and motivation to learn. Dr. Geller will bring her expertise and love for teaching to UCSD where she will teach core undergraduate courses in research methods, statistics, and cognitive psychology. Her hands-on approach to teaching and genuine care for her students promise to make these courses engaging and rewarding!

 
  • Geller, E. H., Son, J. Y., & Stigler, J. W. (in preparation) Conceptual explanations and understanding fraction comparisons.
  • Stigler, J. W., Geller, E. H., & Givvin, K. B. (2015) Zaption: A platform to support teaching, and learning about teaching, with video. Journal of e-­Learning and Knowledge Society, 11(2): 13-25.
  • Bufford, C. A., Mettler, E., Geller, E. H., & Kellman, P. J. (2014) The psychophysics of algebra expertise: Mathematics perceptual learning interventions produce durable encoding changes. Proceedings of the 36th annual meeting of the Cognitive Sciences Society (CogSci); 2014 July 23 – 26; Quebec City, Canada.

Updated Sept 2016

Psychology